Focusing On The Conservation of Ecosystems, Habitats & Wildlife

New Study, New Hope For Critically Endangered Species




New study for species considered ‘too rare to save’ such as the Siberian Tiger.  By targeting key threats, critically endangered species may now have new hope!

Siberian Tiger

Co-author of the report, Dr. Philip Stephens, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, said: “Populations usually show rapid declines as a result of human activities such as hunting and habitat conversion. The results of the study are encouraging and show that if we can remove the negative effects of human activities, even relatively small populations could be viable in the long term.”

Dr. Greg Hayward, the U.S. Forest Service’s (USFS) regional ecologist for Alaska said: “This is good news for biologists working to save species like the tiger. There’s a lot of work to do to arrest the effects of poaching, prey loss and habitat destruction. However, if that work is successful, the tiger might yet be able to recover, despite the relatively small size of most tiger populations.”

The study, published in the journal, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, shows that population sizes required for long-term viability vary, both within and among species, and depend on the specific circumstances in which the population is found. Estimates of viable population sizes were typically reduced to hundreds rather than thousands of individuals for populations that were relatively stable.

To read entire article, click here.

Will TIGERS The “Wild Wonders Of The World” Be Extincted By 2022

At a Tiger Summit Today in St. Petersburg Russia, global wildlife experts predict that Wild Tigers could become extinct in 12 years if countries where they still roam fail to take quick action to protect their habitats and step up the fight against poaching.

The World Wildlife Fund and other experts say only about 3,200 tigers remain in the wild, a dramatic plunge from an estimated 100,000 a century ago.

Leonardo DiCaprio has been working hard all year to help save the world’s tiger population, which as you may recall are in dire straights. As the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) reported, there may be as few as 3200 tigers left in the wild. And recently it was reported that there are more tigers in (cruel) captivity in the U.S. than roaming wild in Asia. DiCaprio, however, is doing his part. First by donating a cool million dollars to the WWF’s tiger campaign and then by going through extreme travel challenges to meet with Vladimir Putin, the Russian Prime Minister, to discuss the tiger situation.

Information found on Tiny Green Bubble.  Click Here To Find Out More About This Cool Site!

Number of Tigers In The Wild Still Declining

Believe it or not, the population of tigers (which is the largest of the big cats) has declined by 95 percent in the last century.  What will happen in the next decade?  Will we ever stop poaching, killing and destroying their habitats before it’s too late?

Bengal Tiger: Click on Photo to View the Tiger Population Table

IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature data suggests that “the global tiger population has declined to an estimated range form 3,402 – 5,140 tigers”, revised down from estimates of 5,000 to 7,000 made a few years earlier.  The data also stated that the Bali, Caspian, and Javan tigers are already classified as extinct (in the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s, respectively).

Celebrating The Year of The Tiger: 2010

TIGERS are known for their ferocity and their power. In Chinese astrology, one of the 12 signs is the sign of the tiger.  Those born in the year of the tiger are assigned the traits of being both colorful and unpredictable.  They are adventurous, powerful, and passionate.




There are possibly as few as 3,200 TIGERS left in the wild. These big cats are the most endangered and threatened species on EARTH. To read more about this “King of the Jungle” CLICK here.


Unfortunately, according to a new report from the conservation nonprofit WWF, there are only 350 wild tigers remaining in Asia’s Mekong River region.  This loss is contributed from the drive by trade in tiger parts.  To watch a video by WWF, click on the link below or or the tiger photo above.


Video Courtesy WWF Greater Mekong