Focusing On The Conservation of Ecosystems, Habitats & Wildlife

New Legislation to Advance Whale Preservation Worldwide




Senator John Kerry, who is the lead author of the Senate’s global climate change and environmental legislation introduced legislation to advance whale preservation worldwide.

This information was found on Senator John Kerry's Website: Click on image to Connect to Article


The International Whale Conservation and Protection Act of 2010 will combat the major threats whales face, including commercial whaling, ship strikes, and habitat disruption.


“Thousands of whales die each year from commercial whaling, ship strikes, and habitat disruption,” said Senator John Kerry. “We should be leading the effort to protect them.”

The International Whale Conservation and Protection Act of 2010 will:

— Promote international protection efforts in whales’ natural habitats


— Strengthen international organizations’ efforts, including the United Nations Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, the International Whaling Commission (IWC), the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), and the International Maritime Organization;


— Ensure the IWC commercial whaling ban is protected


— Reduce or eliminate human-caused injury, harassment, or disturbance; and


—Expand research to improve global understanding of whales including health and reproduction, whale habitats and the impacts of human activities and other threats to whales.


To learn more about the world’s leading animal welfare organization, go to IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare).  This organization helps reduce the commercial exploitation of animals, protects wildlife habitats and assists animals in distress.

Sushi Restaurant in CA Serving Endangered Whale Meat




Charles Hambleton, an associate producer of the Oscar-winning documentary “The Cove” learned from friends that a restaurant in Santa Monica, CA was serving whale.  He decided to team up with animal activists who dined at the restaurant while wearing small cameras and mini microphones.  “Video of their meal shows the two activists, both vegan, being served what the waitress can be heard calling “whale” — thick pink slices — that they take squeamish bites of before tossing into a Ziploc bag in a purse,” reports the New York Times.

The meat was taken to a lab which was found to be the flesh of the Sei Whale.

Sei Whale: Photo found on www.marinewhales.com

So how is it possible that a sushi restaurant called The Hump in Santa Monica, California was serving “thick pink slices” of meat which were later found to be the flesh of Sei whale, which is an endangered species?

It is called “kujira” in Japanese and this marine mammal has been dwindling in numbers for years.  The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 makes it illegal to take these mammals from U.S. waters and the Sei whales are protected internationally, but that hasn’t stopped Japan from killing these creatures.  Claiming that they need them for scientific purposes, Japan has exempted itself from the moratorium on capturing the whales.

The question most people are asking now is “how could Sei Whale meat end up in a sushi restaurant in one of the most environmentally friendly places in the United States?”