Focusing On The Conservation of Ecosystems, Habitats & Wildlife

Orangutan Awareness Week Nov 7-14

Reach Out and Save The Orangutans This Week

…………

Visit Orangutan Caring Week. Org & Red Apes. Org

For More Information and Ideas


CLICK HERE To

Adopt An Orangutan Today !



Orangutans Are Highly Endangered and Have Less Than 10 Years Left In The Wild Before They Are Extinct!

Finally…Madagascar Reinstates Ban of Rosewood

I was sooo happy to see this ban reinstated last week on Rosewood logging and exports in Madagascar! Can you imagine….illegal logging of its NATIONAL PARKS!

Photo found on WildMadagascar.Org

Unfortuantely, over 20,000 acres of Madagascar’s rainforests were affected, including Marojejy, Masoala and Makira national parks which are some of the island’s most biologically diverse rainforests.

Andrea Johnson of EIA (Environmental Investigation Agency) wrote via email “We’re hopeful that this moratorium marks a decision by the transition government to consider the long-term value of Madagascar’s natural resources and end the uncontrolled exploitation of the forest for quick profit.”  She also said  “We’d like to believe this is actually the beginning of a new book, not just the start of another chapter in the recent sad story of corruption and plunder of Madagascar’s irreplaceable forests.”

Deforestation in the U.S. – A Look Back

Losing the trees and the loss of animal habitats is unforgivable, however it is happening everywhere.

Do we continue to ignore the consequences that affect us all and wreck havoc on our ecosystems?

Found on The Conservation Report by Buck Denton - Click Here to Read Article and Follow Blog


Above is a chart showing the deforestation and devastation in the United States from 1620 – present.  Do we need visual charts to see just what we are doing to the EARTH?

Keep in Mind: Each dot represents 25,000 acres of forests!

When will we learn? When will we stop? When will it be too late?

Deforestation Creates "Fragments" in Monkey Habitats




Research is now suggesting that monkey populations are much more sensitive to the destructive damage to their habitats than previously thought.


It also found that “the health of monkey population is closely related to the type of habitat found between forest fragments, rather than the distance that separates them.”


An Udzungwa red colobus monkey. (Credit: Andrew Marshall / University of York)


The research was conducted by Dr. Andrew Marshall, from the Environment Department at the University of York and Director of Conservation at Flamingo Land Theme Park and Zoo, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of York, the University of Copenhagen, the Tremto Musuem of Natural History (Italy) and the Udzungwa Ecological Monitoring Centre (Tanzania).


The lastest research is published in the American Journal of Primatology.

Jungle Jenny believes it is more important now to focus on protecting larger forest areas that are now under threat.  “How happy and healthy would we feel if all the trees that surrounded our habitat were hacked down?”

Brink of Extinction for Half of all Primates

According to many experts from across the world, nearly half of all primate species are in danger of becoming extinct.


Conservationists said in a news statement recently about the release of the report Primates in Peril: The World’s 25 Most Endangered Primates, 2008-2010 that “mankind’s closest living relatives–the world’s apes, monkeys, lemurs and other primates–are on the brink of extinction and in need of urgent conservation measures”.





Conservationist say this threat is mostly due to the destruction of tropical forests, illegal wildlife trade and commercial bush-meat hunting.

Celebrating The Year of The Tiger: 2010

TIGERS are known for their ferocity and their power. In Chinese astrology, one of the 12 signs is the sign of the tiger.  Those born in the year of the tiger are assigned the traits of being both colorful and unpredictable.  They are adventurous, powerful, and passionate.




There are possibly as few as 3,200 TIGERS left in the wild. These big cats are the most endangered and threatened species on EARTH. To read more about this “King of the Jungle” CLICK here.


Unfortunately, according to a new report from the conservation nonprofit WWF, there are only 350 wild tigers remaining in Asia’s Mekong River region.  This loss is contributed from the drive by trade in tiger parts.  To watch a video by WWF, click on the link below or or the tiger photo above.


Video Courtesy WWF Greater Mekong


Endangered Animal Trading on the Rise in Indonesia

I’m so sad to see that the forest areas in Indonesia are still being converted and taken over by humans forcing endemic wildlife species to flee the area.  Indonesia is home to many wonderful animals, some of which are only found there.  Is man’s needs for natural resources more important than keeping a species off the endangered species list?



The Green Turtle is “still the main turtle trade destination in Indonesia”, says Rosek Nurasahid, a ProFauna International wildlife observer.  According to the 2009 end -of-the-year report, ProFauna announced that trade in protected animals species in Indonesia was still high.  The latest ProFauna survey conducted at 70 birds markets in 58 cities in 2009 indicated 183 rare and protected animal species had been traded.


To read more on this, CLICK HERE to read the article found on Asia One News or click on photo below.


Photo taken by: Matt Einholf

Madagascar’s Political Chaos Threatens Conservation Gains




Jungle Jenny encourages eco/wildlife tourism in Madagascar.  If you have any questions about where to go email me!  I found this article today (click here) by Rhett Butler, who is is the founder and editor of Mongabay.com, one of the leading sites on the Web covering tropical forests and biodiversity.

Jungle Jenny with Lemur in Nosy Komba, Madagascar where eco-tourism generates revenue at the lemur reserve at Ampangorina.


Since the government’s collapse after a coup last March, Madagascar’s rainforests have been plundered for their precious wood and unique wildlife. But now there are a few encouraging signs, as officials promise a crackdown on illegal logging and ecotourists begin to return to the island.