Focusing On The Conservation of Ecosystems, Habitats & Wildlife

Happy 2010 World Environmental Weekend

2010 Theme: Many Species. One Planet. One Future

This year’s event will celebrate the incredible diversity of life on Earth as part of “The 2010 International Year of Biodiversity.”



According to Wikipedia, World Environment Day (WED) is a day that stimulates awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and public action. It is on 5 June. It was the day that United Nations Conference on the Human Environment began. The United Nations Conference on the Human Environment was from 5-16 June 1972. It was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1972.[1] The first World Environment Day was on 1973. World Environment Day is hosted every year by a different city with a different theme and is commemorated with an international exposition in the week of 5 June. World Environment Day is in summer in the Northern Hemisphere and winter in the Southern Hemisphere.



This year’s global host, Rwanda – a country of exceptional biodiversity that has made huge strides on environmental protection – will lead the celebrations with three days of keynote events.

Thousands of activities will also be organized worldwide, with beach clean-ups, concerts, exhibits, film festivals, community events and much more!

Why Louisiana’s Wetlands Are So Important

“Every 2.7 square miles of wetlands that a storm passes over, brings the storm surge for communities behind those wetlands down by one foot.”



David Muth, chief of planning and resource stewardship for Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve and Professor Larry McKinney, executive director at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M in Corpus Christi, explain the importance of the Louisiana wetlands in protecting Greater New Orleans from storm surges and as a source of food for the entire country. (msnbc.com) Louisiana – New Orleans – Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve – Texas – United States

Click on Link or Photo Below To Watch The Clip of “Why Louisiana’s Wetlands Are So Important” From The Rachel Maddox Show

Why Louisiana’s Wetlands Are So Important

Great Barrier Reef in Trouble: Chinese Oil Spill in Restricted Waters






I was horrified to see this Easter morning that a 755-foot Chinese owned bulk coal carrier rammed into the Great Barrier Reed earlier today.  I can’t even imagine the devastating damage that may occur to this ecosystem with this oil spill.

Even though coral reefs only cover approximately 1% of the world’s oceans, it provides homes to about 25% of all identified marine species.

Chinese Coal Ship Stranded West of Queensland state


The greatest threat now is that this vessel has almost 300,000 gallons of heavy fuel oil on the ship to run its engine which could end up in the Pacific Ocean.  The Australian authorities are doing everything possible to limit the impact of this incident.  A CNN quick summary broadcast below.

Changing Habits: Paper or Plastic?

“Changing Habits for Habitats”

How many times have you heard “Paper or Plastic” and which one is better for our habitat and health?  The truth is, they are both Killing us!

What does it take to change are own Habits?

When will we ever learn?  When will we start demanding change?

When will it be too late?  Will we continue to allow our forests to be hacked down…..our water to be polluted and contaminated….our food to be poisoned with pesticides….our natural resources to be striped beyond salvation.

Our climate crisis is more serious than ever now and it’s critical that we participate in making the right choices for the Future of the EARTH.


ASK YOURSELF TODAY………

How can I change my habits before I contribute in destroying my own Habitat?

REMEMBER…..IT’S OUR CHOICE………


I LOVE this Short Film “Plastic Bag” by Ramin Bahrani

Please Watch this Video….. and Attempt To Change One Small Habit Today That Will Help SAVE Our Habitat For The Future!




Would you believe ONLY 1 percent of plastic bags are recycled worldwide — about 2 percent in the U.S.

To read the article “Plastic Bags Are Killing Us” (CLICK HERE or on photo below).


Plastic Bags Are Killing Us

According to the Environment Programme, “Floating bags can look all too much like tasty jellyfish to hungry marine critters. According to the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation, more than a million birds and 100,000 marine mammals and sea turtles die every year from eating or getting entangled in plastic. The conservation group estimates that 50 percent of all marine litter is some form of plastic. There are 46,000 pieces of plastic litter floating in every square mile of ocean.”

Deforestation in the U.S. – A Look Back

Losing the trees and the loss of animal habitats is unforgivable, however it is happening everywhere.

Do we continue to ignore the consequences that affect us all and wreck havoc on our ecosystems?

Found on The Conservation Report by Buck Denton - Click Here to Read Article and Follow Blog


Above is a chart showing the deforestation and devastation in the United States from 1620 – present.  Do we need visual charts to see just what we are doing to the EARTH?

Keep in Mind: Each dot represents 25,000 acres of forests!

When will we learn? When will we stop? When will it be too late?

Number of Tigers In The Wild Still Declining

Believe it or not, the population of tigers (which is the largest of the big cats) has declined by 95 percent in the last century.  What will happen in the next decade?  Will we ever stop poaching, killing and destroying their habitats before it’s too late?

Bengal Tiger: Click on Photo to View the Tiger Population Table

IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature data suggests that “the global tiger population has declined to an estimated range form 3,402 – 5,140 tigers”, revised down from estimates of 5,000 to 7,000 made a few years earlier.  The data also stated that the Bali, Caspian, and Javan tigers are already classified as extinct (in the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s, respectively).

Special Valentine's Day for the San Diego Zoo

The San Diego Wild Animal Park received a special gift on Valentine’s Day – a baby African Elephant. At approximately 2:00 a.m., visitors that were camping at the zoo said they heard elephants “trumpeting” which commonly occurs when a baby calf is born.





Details have not been released for this baby African elephant, however newborns usually weigh between 250 and 300 pounds and stand approxiamtely tree feet tall.  With this new addition, the Swaziland herd has grown to more than a dozen.

Ridley Turtle Conservation in Ostional, Costa Rica

The Ostional Wildlife Refuge, which was developed by the Costa Rican government, allows villagers to harvest Olive Ridley Turtle eggs, but under strict guidelines.


Overall, the number of Olive Ridley nests have grown substantially each year due to a number of partners involved in The Egg Harvest Project (EHP).


To Read this article (CLICK HERE) or click on the photo below.



Arribada of Olive Ridley females, crawling up a beach to nest above the high tide level. (Source NOAA, Michael Jensen).