Focusing On The Conservation of Ecosystems, Habitats & Wildlife

Happy 2010 World Environmental Weekend

2010 Theme: Many Species. One Planet. One Future

This year’s event will celebrate the incredible diversity of life on Earth as part of “The 2010 International Year of Biodiversity.”



According to Wikipedia, World Environment Day (WED) is a day that stimulates awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and public action. It is on 5 June. It was the day that United Nations Conference on the Human Environment began. The United Nations Conference on the Human Environment was from 5-16 June 1972. It was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1972.[1] The first World Environment Day was on 1973. World Environment Day is hosted every year by a different city with a different theme and is commemorated with an international exposition in the week of 5 June. World Environment Day is in summer in the Northern Hemisphere and winter in the Southern Hemisphere.



This year’s global host, Rwanda – a country of exceptional biodiversity that has made huge strides on environmental protection – will lead the celebrations with three days of keynote events.

Thousands of activities will also be organized worldwide, with beach clean-ups, concerts, exhibits, film festivals, community events and much more!

Happy Endangered Species Day 2010

So what does an “Endangered Species” mean…. you may ask?

It is when any animal or plant species is threatened to the point of extinction.  Once a species is “extinct”, it is gone FOREVER and no longer found anywhere on Earth.

Special Thanks to Laurence Overmire & Nancy McDonald For Including Me In Their Awesome Video!

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Help Protect Endangered Species


So Why Is It So Important To SAVE Endangered Species?

There has been a dramatic increase in the number of endangered or extinct species since humans have been the Earth’s dominant species.  Human activities such as overhunting and destruction of habitats are responsible for most of endangered or extinct animals.  It is now believed that extinction by humans are taking place at 100 to 1,000 times nature’s normal rate.  It has been so hard to measure since only about 1.4 million species (out of an estimated 10 million to 100 million) have been described to date.

It is more crucial than ever for humans to preserve endangered species and their natural habitats.  All species are living organisms on Earth and have a know value to humans.  Humans benefit from the roles many species play in the environment including cleansing the air and water, controlling erosion, providing atmospheric oxygen, and maintaining the food chain.  Some other benefits of these many species haven’t even been discovered yet (such as medicinal plants) and presently have an unknown value to humans.